Andrei Roiter

Throughout the oeuvre of Andrei Roiter, living and working in both Amsterdam and New York, the idea of being on the move has become a crucial subject. He is constantly mapping the world, as an observer, creating a new order for his memories, and excavating them as an archaeologist. He reflects on his homeland as a ‘wanderer,’ or artist-tourist,’ as Victor Missiano describes the key attitude in his work. Roiter works with a number of media, including sculpture, drawing, photography, installation, and painting. His layered method frequently starts with building three-dimensional objects that he calls ‘props’, made of found materials and with an archetypical aura. Often, Roiter paints ´still lifes´ of these odd props. In this translation of poor material into poetic and meaningful form, he feels himself close to movements as arte povera.

 

 

 

Andrei Roiter was born in Moscow in 1960. He attended the Moscow Institute of Architecture from 1978-1980, during which time he began to show his works in underground exhibition spaces. Since the mid-80’s Roiter took part in several international exhibitions of Russian art in Europe and the U.S. Since 1990, Roiter has lived in the West, exhibiting in Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, Japan and USA. Among the more notable exhibitions were those at Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland; SF Museum of Modern Art; Ludwig Forum-Achen; Kunsthalle Recklinghausen, Germany; Schiedam State Museum, Netherlands; Kunstmuseum Solothurn, Switzeland; Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Moscow; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands; Centre Pompidou, Paris and in Museum Bonnefanten in Maasticht, Netherlands. Roiter currently lives between NY and Amsterdam. His work is in many private and public collections throughout the globe, mostly in the US, Belgium and the Netherlands.

  • Light Square, 2018, oil on canvas, 90 x 100 cm

  • Greenscape, 2018. oil on canvas, 110 x 100 cm

  • Blue Stack, 2018, oil on canvas, 110 x 90 cm

  • Invisible Wall. 2018, oil on canvas, 45 x 75 cm

  • Green Stage, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 183 x 150 cm (photo: Noortje Knulst)